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Facts About Deer Ticks

A devastating illness in humans, Lyme disease can also be found in dogs and cats. The disease is rarely fatal, but it can be very painful and hard to diagnose. Deer ticks are the carriers of Lyme disease.

Adult deer ticks are very small compared to other ticks, and go through 4 life stages- egg, larvae, nymph and adult. About the size of a sesame seed, female deer ticks have brown bodies, with red abdomens and black legs. The males of the species are also brown, but smaller.

Deer ticks will feed on a variety of hosts throughout the tick's life cycle, depending on what phase they are in. As larvae, they will feed on smaller hosts such as mice or birds. As nymphs, they can be found on skunks or opossums. When they become adults, deer ticks seek out larger hosts, like deer or bear. Through some of these phases, the deer tick will contract Lyme disease from an infected host, and then pass it along.

Deer ticks were first recorded as a species in the 1920's in Massachusetts. These ticks were found on livestock. Since that time, deer ticks have been found through most of the Eastern and Midwestern U.S., and parts of Canada and Mexico. In the 1970's, deer ticks were discovered to be the primary carriers of Lyme disease. Scientists believe they may even be the only carriers of this disease.

Deer ticks are sometimes confused with brown dog ticks, but this can only be in relation to their color. The size of a dog tick is much larger than the size of a deer tick.

Deer ticks, or blacklegged ticks, are known as the primary vector, or carrier, of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a debilitating illness in humans and can also be found in dogs and cats. It is currently thought that only deer ticks may carry Lyme disease.

Adult deer ticks are very small compared to other ticks and go through 4 life stages-egg, larvae, nymph and adult. The adult female deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies, red abdomens, and black legs. Deer tick males are brown and slightly smaller than the females.

Although they are the most prevalent during the months of April to September, deer ticks can be found year-round in various stages of their life cycle. The deer tick in its most dangerous phase, the nymph phase, is extremely tiny. It is about the size of a pinhead. These ticks are very hard to detect.

Deer ticks will crawl on a host for up to 4 hours before feeding. They attach themselves to humans at the base of the scalp. Reduce your exposure to deer ticks when they are most active. If you are in the woods, keep yourself protected with a hat. Wear light-colored clothing, which makes it easier to spot ticks if any crawl on you.

If bitten by a tick you suspect may be a carrier, remove the tick carefully and preserve it in rubbing alcohol. Identifying the vector is the easiest way to be sure that symptoms can be attributed to the correct disease, and for proper treatment to be administered.

Deer ticks will normally complete their life cycles in 2 years. If hosts are scarce, the life cycle can extend to 4 years. Adult deer ticks will mate and feed in the winter. After mating, the male deer tick will die and the female will spend the winter on the host.

Adult deer ticks are very small compared to other ticks and go through 4 life stages; egg, larvae, nymph and adult. The adult deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies and black legs. Female deer ticks have red abdomens.

In the spring, the female will drop to the ground and lay her eggs, about 3,000 of them, and then die. The eggs will hatch within several days, and the 6-legged larvae will search for food. The deer tick larvae stage usually occurs from June to September. Larvae will overwinter if they feed late in the year and molt into nymphs the following spring. Nymphs feed once from April to August, then molt into adults in the fall. They will then attach themselves to their host, usually a white-tailed deer.

Ticks will attach to hosts of different sizes throughout their life stages. White-footed mice and other small mammals are hosts for the first stage. As the tick grows, it will seek out larger hosts, such as skunks or dogs. Eventually, as an adult, it will find deer to feed on.

Deer ticks must feed in these various stages or they will die, but they can last quite a long time between meals. Most deer ticks must feed within the first season of their life stage, but some can last through two seasons. Although they are the most prevalent during the months of April to September, deer ticks can be found year-round in various stages of their life cycles.

Deer ticks, or blacklegged ticks, are known as the primary vector, or carrier, of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a debilitating illness in humans and can also be found in dogs and cats. Symptoms of Lyme disease may not appear until 6 weeks after a bite occurs. Ticks are one of the leading carriers of diseases in the world, next to the mosquito.

Adult deer ticks are very small compared to other ticks and go through 4 life stages-egg, larvae, nymph and adult. The female deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies, red abdomens and black legs. Deer tick males are brown and slightly smaller than the females.

Deer ticks will crawl on a host for up to 4 hours before feeding. They attach themselves to humans at the base of the scalp. Deer tick bites are normally painless and often go undetected. Even after the deer tick has fed and dropped off, the site where the bite occurred may not be painful.

Reduce your exposure to deer ticks during the season they are most active, which usually lasts from April to September. If you are out in the woods, keep yourself protected with a hat. Wear light-colored clothing, which makes it easier to spot ticks if they crawl on you.

If bitten by a tick you suspect may be a carrier of Lyme disease, seek medical attention. Be sure and inform your physician that you were in the woods and were bitten by a tick. Preserve the tick, if possible, in rubbing alcohol. Identifying the vector is the easiest way to be sure that symptoms can be attributed to the correct disease and for proper treatment to be administered.

Although they are the most prevalent during the months of April to September, deer ticks can be found year-round in various stages of their life cycles.

Deer ticks will normally complete their life cycles in 2 years. If hosts are scarce, the life cycle can extend to 4 years. Adult deer ticks will mate and feed in the winter. The male deer tick will die and the female will spend the winter on the host.

Adult deer ticks are very small compared to other ticks and go through 4 life stages-egg, larvae, nymph and adult. The adult deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies and black legs. Female deer ticks have red abdomens.

In the spring, the female will drop to the ground and lay her eggs, about 3,000 of them, and then die. The eggs will hatch within several days and the 6-legged larvae will search for food. The deer tick larvae stage usually occurs from June to September. Larvae will overwinter if they feed late in the year and molt into nymphs the following spring.

Nymphs feed once from April to August, then molt into adults in the fall. They will then attach themselves to their host, usually a white-tailed deer. The deer tick in its most dangerous phase, the nymph phase, is extremely tiny. It is about the size of a pinhead. These ticks are very hard to detect.

Ticks will attach to hosts of different sizes throughout their life stages. White-footed mice and other small mammals are hosts for the first stage. As the tick grows, it will seek out larger hosts, such as skunks or dogs. Eventually as an adult, it will find deer to feed on.

Reduce your exposure to deer ticks during the season they are most active, usually from April to September. If you are in the woods, keep yourself protected with a hat. Wear light-colored clothing, which makes it easier to spot ticks if they crawl on you.

Deer ticks are very small and difficult to spot, especially in their early life stages, so make sure you do a complete check of yourself and your companions after a hike. Have a friend perform a “tick check” to ensure there are no ticks on the back of your head or clothing. If your pet hikes with you, look deep in your animal's fur and use a fine-tooth comb to be more thorough.

The female deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies, red abdomens and black legs. Deer tick males are brown and slightly smaller than the females. In early life stages, deer ticks may be no larger than a speck of pepper.

If a deer tick bites you, seek medical attention as soon as possible. If you find a tick on yourself or your pet, remove it carefully and completely.

Once you locate a deer tick on yourself or your pet, removing it can be done easily Take a pair of small-tipped tweezers and grasp the tick firmly. Pull directly away from your skin and try to get the complete tick. Even if the mouthparts do get left behind, the tick can no longer transmit disease. Wash the area with soap and water and throw the tick away.

Do not try to light a match under a deer tick or smother it in petroleum jelly or nail polish remover. These methods can cause the tick to dig in deeper and can also cause you harm.

If bitten by a tick you suspect may be a deer tick, remove the tick carefully and preserve it in rubbing alcohol. Identifying the vector is the easiest way to be sure that symptoms can be attributed to the correct disease and for proper treatment to be administered.

Deer ticks are significantly smaller than the average tick. This makes them extremely hard to spot, even as full-grown adults. The female deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed, 1/6th to 1/8th of an inch in length. They have brown bodies, red abdomens and black legs. Deer tick males are brown and slightly smaller than the females.

Although they are the most prevalent during the months of April to September, deer ticks can be found year-round in various stages of their life cycle. The deer tick in its most dangerous phase, the nymph phase, is extremely tiny. It is about the size of a pinhead. These ticks are very hard to detect.

Deer ticks can be found outdoors on the bodies of their hosts as well as in places where grasses meet wooded areas. These transition areas are favorite spots for deer ticks because most animals travel through these areas.

Deer ticks will crawl on a host for up to 4 hours before feeding. They attach themselves to humans at the base of the scalp in most cases. Even when they have fed and are fully engorged, deer ticks are still very hard to detect.

Reduce your exposure to deer ticks during the time they are most active. If you are out in the woods, keep yourself protected with a hat. Wear light-colored clothing, which makes it easier to spot ticks. Deer ticks in their nymph stages will appear as specks of black pepper on white or light clothing.

If bitten by a tick you suspect may be a carrier, remove the tick carefully and preserve it in rubbing alcohol. Identifying the vector is the easiest way to be sure that symptoms can be attributed to the correct disease and for proper treatment to be administered.

Deer ticks, or blacklegged ticks are known as the primary vector, or carrier of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a debilitating illness in humans and can also be found in dogs and cats. It is currently thought that only deer ticks may carry Lyme disease

Wood ticks and deer ticks both have a four-stage life cycle- egg, larva, nymph and adult. The tick mates when it is on the host's body. After mating, the female tick drops to the ground and lays her eggs. Once the eggs hatch, the larvae must feed on a host. After this first meal, they drop again to the ground and shed their skin to emerge as nymphs. The nymph will then find a host, feed, then molt and become an adult.

Adult deer ticks are very small compared to other ticks. The adult female deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies, red abdomens and black legs. Deer tick males are brown and slightly smaller than the females.

Wood ticks and deer ticks are both three-host ticks, which means they need to feed off of a different host in the various stages of their lives. Female wood ticks will feed until they are fully engorged, while males will feed and then look for a mate. After the mate is found, they return to feeding. Female deer ticks will feed for longer times than males as well.

Be vigilant when you are outdoors during tick season, which usually lasts from April to September. Check for ticks frequently and if you are bitten, try to keep the tick species preserved for identification.

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