Female Black Widow Spiders

The body (both the cephalothorax and abdomen) of an adult female black widow is about 0.5″. The abdomen is very rounded, shiny and large, about ¼” in diameter. It can even be as large as 0.5″ if the female is carrying eggs. Overall, including its legs, a female black widow is about 1-0.5 to 1-3/8 inches long. Males are approximately half the size of the females.

These spiders are usually black in color, and on the under side of their abdomen, they have two unique triangle-shaped markings that form an hourglass. These markings can vary from yellowish or orange to reddish in color. Sometimes there is only one triangle-type marking. Females may also have red spots along their backs.

It is the bite of only the female black widow that is worrisome. Her venom can be harmful to people, whereas a male black widow is not considered a threat to humans. If bitten, a person may or may not actually feel the fangs puncture the skin, but generally will feel pain fairly quickly afterward. The victim may notice two tiny red spots where the fangs entered the skin.

People's reaction to black widow bites varies depending on the location of the bite, the amount of venom injected, and that particular person's sensitivity. Symptoms can include nausea, fever, sweating, labored breathing, or tremors. If treated, black widow bites are rarely fatal, and there is an anti-venom available for these bites.

Females construct an irregular web to catch prey. This looks like a mess of random threads with no recognizable pattern and is usually found near ground level. The female mostly stays in the web, retreating to one side or the center, and often hangs upside down allowing potential victims to recognize her hourglass marking. The spider's prey consists of insects, such as roaches or beetles.

The females create eggs sacs and will deposit up to 250 eggs in one. The sacs are whitish initially, but will soon turn to a tan color. They are silky, tightly woven and quite tough. Although the females are generally withdrawn, they can be aggressive when protecting their eggs. After the young spiders hatch, the females have little involvement.

Deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, are known as the primary vector, or carrier, of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a debilitating illness in humans, but can also be found in dogs and cats. It is currently thought that only deer ticks may carry Lyme disease.

Adult deer ticks are very small compared to other ticks, and go through 4 life stages-egg, larvae, nymph and adult. The adult female deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies, red abdomens and black legs. Deer tick males are brown and slightly smaller than the females.

Deer ticks will normally complete their lifecycles in 2 years. If hosts are scarce, the lifecycle can extend to 4 years. Adult deer ticks will mate in the winter and feed. The male deer tick will die, and the female will spend the winter on the host, feeding and preparing for spring. Female deer ticks will expand when feeding to many times their original size.

In the spring, the female will drop to the ground and lay her eggs. Female deer ticks will look for a moist area to deposit the eggs, about 3,000 of them. The female will then die.

Female deer ticks will feed for longer times from their hosts, so you can sometimes find them still attached. Removing a tick can be done easily. Take a pair of small-tipped tweezers and grasp the tick firmly. Pull directly away from your skin and try to get the complete tick. Even if the mouthparts do get left behind, the tick can no longer transmit disease. Wash the area with soap and water, and throw the tick away. If bitten by a tick you suspect may be a carrier, remove the tick carefully and preserve it in rubbing alcohol. Seek medical attention.

Deer ticks are not to be confused with brown dog ticks. Although both tick species are hard ticks and are brown in color, the deer tick is very different from other common ticks.

Deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, are known as the primary vector, or carrier, of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a debilitating illness in humans and can also be found in dogs and cats. It is currently thought that only deer ticks may carry Lyme disease.

Adult deer ticks are very small compared to other ticks, and go through 4 life stages-egg, larvae, nymph and adult. The adult female deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies, red abdomens, and black legs. Deer tick males are brown and slightly smaller than the females.

Although they are most prevalent during the months of April to September, deer ticks can be found year-round in various stages of their life cycle. The deer tick in its most dangerous phase, the nymph phase, is extremely tiny. It is about the size of a pinhead. These ticks are very hard to detect.

Deer ticks will crawl on a host for up to 4 hours before feeding. They attach themselves to humans at the base of the scalp. Reduce your exposure to deer ticks when they are most active. If you are in the woods, keep yourself protected with a hat. Wear light-colored clothing, which makes it easier to spot ticks if any crawl on you.

Deer ticks, also know as blacklegged ticks are known as the primary vector, or carrier, of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a debilitating illness in humans and can also be found in dogs and cats, as well as livestock. It is currently thought that only deer ticks can carry Lyme disease.

Deer ticks can be very difficult, if not impossible, to locate on your pets. The female deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies, red abdomens and black legs. Deer tick males are brown and slightly smaller than the females. In their nymph stage, they are the most likely to become carriers of Lyme disease. At this point in their development, they are no bigger than the head of a pin.

Prevention is one of the best ways to be sure your pets don't come in contact with deer ticks. When exercising your dog, be sure to avoid areas where the woods become meadows. These transition areas are where most deer ticks can be found. After an outdoor adventure, comb your pet with a fine-tooth comb to locate as many ticks as you can. Remove any ticks you find immediately.

Consult your veterinarian if your pet exhibits any symptoms of Lyme disease. The symptoms are similar to those in humans, such as lethargy, fever and fatigue. Some pets will exhibit no symptoms, so it can be difficult to diagnose. Livestock will display the same symptoms. Usually horses, cattle and sheep are susceptible to the disease.

Deer ticks go by different names in the different regions they are found. Deer ticks are also known as blacklegged ticks, or bear ticks. Blacklegged or deer ticks are found in the northeast, mid-Atlantic, southeast and north central areas of the US. These same ticks are called bear ticks in the Midwest.

Adult deer ticks are very small compared to other ticks and go through 4 life stages- egg, larvae, nymph and adult. The adult female deer ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed. They have brown bodies, red abdomens and black legs. Deer tick males are brown and slightly smaller than the females.

Deer ticks can be found outdoors on the bodies of their hosts, as well as in places where grasses meet wooded areas. These transition areas are favorite spots for deer ticks because most animals travel through these areas.

Deer ticks are known as the primary vector, or carrier, of Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a debilitating illness in humans, but can also be found in dogs and cats. It is currently thought that only deer ticks can carry Lyme disease.

Reduce your exposure to deer ticks during the season they are most active, usually from April to September. If you are in the woods, keep yourself protected with a hat. Wear light-colored clothing, which makes it easier to spot ticks if they crawl on you. Be vigilant in areas where Lyme disease has been reported.

If you find a tick on yourself, remove it immediately. Adult deer ticks will take up to 4 hours to find a feeding spot on a host, so you may not have received a bite if you find a deer tick on your body. Check the base of the hairline on your neck thoroughly, as that is where deer ticks are usually found.